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History of Farming in Livingston County Exhibit

By Deb Holmes, Livingston County Farm Bureau Administrative Manager


The Livingston County Farm Bureau Board is planning to partner with 4-H, Fowlerville FFA, Kensington Farm Center, Fowlerville Fair Board, local farms, Hudson Mills Tractor Club, and local equipment dealers to show the history of farming in Livingston County.  This event will be held at the Fowlerville Family Fair, July 22-27, 2019.  Planned demonstrations consist of harnessing horses to antique tractors to new equipment with the focus on highlighting farms in the county and their family farming history.

The Kensington Farm Center will bring draft horses to the fair and will provide daily harness and driving demonstrations.  Hudson Mills Tractor Club will bring an array of tractors of all colors dating back to the early 1900's and provide educated volunteers to discuss the equipment.  Munsell Farms will provide horse drawn harvesting equipment.  Local dealers will supply new equipment and discuss current technology. 

To highlight the diversity of agriculture in Livingston County, local farms are being asked to create a display of the history of their farm, what they produce and how they market their products.

Are you interested in showcasing your farm?  Please contact the LCFB office at:  [email protected] or by calling at (517) 546-8124.
The Livingston County Farm Bureau Board is planning to partner with 4-H, FFA, Kensington Farm Center, Fowlerville Fair Board, local farms, Hudson Mills Tractor Club, and local equipment dealers to show the history of farming in Livingston County. Th

Livingston County Farm Bureau News

red tractor working field mfn 20182020 will mark the 18th year Livingston County Farm Bureau (LCFB) will hold an education day specially targeted for elementary (3rd grade) students.  The goal of Agriculture Awareness Day is to present an educational activity designed to provide hands-on agriculture and natural resources education for students, teachers, parents and chaperones.  Agriculture Awareness Day is the biggest single day event LCFB presents to the public each year.

Some of the benefits of Agriculture Awareness Day are:
1) Education of consumers on where their food comes from.
2) Successfully teaches students and consumers about agriculture through interactive and fun activities.
3) Raises awareness of the need for agriculture in our society.
4) Instills proper land use and awareness of natural resources.
5) Provides teachers useful classroom educational materials to integrate into their curriculum.

In 2020 Agriculture Awareness Day will be held on Thursday, May 28, 2020, at the Fowlerville Family Fairgrounds in Fowlerville.  Volunteers will present short lessons to the various classroom groups on topics ranging from seed germination and dairy nutrition to live animal exhibits.  Over 800 third graders from Pinckney, Fowlerville, and Howell schools are expected to benefit from all of the hard work by the volunteers.

The success of this program depends on the coordinated efforts of over 100 adult and teen volunteers.  We need the assistance of volunteers to help guide the students plus those able to complete manual labor required for the set-up/tear-down of the exhibit.  If you would like further information, please contact Deb Holmes at the LCFB office at (517) 546-8124 or [email protected].

2020 will mark the 18th year Livingston County Farm Bureau has held an education day specifically targeted for elementary students.

LCFB Vice President, Matt Marston named to MFB Leadership Class

Livingston County Farm Bureau Vice President, Matt Marston, was selected from amongst 90 nominations from county Farm Bureaus across Michigan to participate in the 2020-21 ProFILE Leadership class.  Marston and the other 17 participants will begin ProFILE's 15-month agenda of leadership and professional development activities, including expert speakers, involvement opportunities and visits to ag-industry sites in Michigan and nearby states.  ProFILE gets underway in January 2020 with orientation at the Michigan Farm Bureau (MFB) home office in Lansing and a visit to Carhartt's headquarters in Dearborn.

Meetings in February and March will include participation in MFB's Washington Legislative Seminar.  The busy summertime offers an optional picnic outing before the schedule ramps back up again in September and a flurry of activity the following winter.

In January 2021 participants will embark on a five-day multistate bus trip, then take part in MFB's Lansing Legislative Seminar the following month before the program concludes with a graduation ceremony in March 2021.

Established in 1990, ProFILE is an intensive leadership development course for the best and brightest young Farm Bureau members ages 25-35.  Prospective participants are first nominated by their county Farm Bureau then selected by a MFB staff panel based on the strength of their applications.
LCFB Vice President, Matt Marston, chosen for MFB 2020-21 ProFILE leadership class

History of Farming in Livingston County Exhibit

By Deb Holmes, Livingston County Farm Bureau Administrative Manager


The Livingston County Farm Bureau Board is planning to partner with 4-H, Fowlerville FFA, Kensington Farm Center, Fowlerville Fair Board, local farms, Hudson Mills Tractor Club, and local equipment dealers to show the history of farming in Livingston County.  This event will be held at the Fowlerville Family Fair, July 22-27, 2019.  Planned demonstrations consist of harnessing horses to antique tractors to new equipment with the focus on highlighting farms in the county and their family farming history.

The Kensington Farm Center will bring draft horses to the fair and will provide daily harness and driving demonstrations.  Hudson Mills Tractor Club will bring an array of tractors of all colors dating back to the early 1900's and provide educated volunteers to discuss the equipment.  Munsell Farms will provide horse drawn harvesting equipment.  Local dealers will supply new equipment and discuss current technology. 

To highlight the diversity of agriculture in Livingston County, local farms are being asked to create a display of the history of their farm, what they produce and how they market their products.

Are you interested in showcasing your farm?  Please contact the LCFB office at:  [email protected] or by calling at (517) 546-8124.
The Livingston County Farm Bureau Board is planning to partner with 4-H, FFA, Kensington Farm Center, Fowlerville Fair Board, local farms, Hudson Mills Tractor Club, and local equipment dealers to show the history of farming in Livingston County. Th

State News

Michigan Farm Bureau
The 2020 ProFILE class

From a group of young Michigan professionals feeling the first warm rays of spring on their face after a long, cold winter, the upbeat chatter is to be expected. Ahead of them lies one mile of rolling Pennsylvania farmland, a late-afternoon walk in air that’s fresh and over ground popping with the season’s first shoots of green.

At the command of instructor Joe Mieczkowski, the march commences. It’s a walk that takes roughly 30 minutes at a leisurely pace. Mieczkowski pauses along the way:

“2,500 left at this point.”

“1,000 left.”

“500 left.”

“250 left.”

The laughter and conversation wane as the distance between the group and the stone wall is reduced. And understandably so. While this land is now covered in crops, somewhere below the surface is the blood of thousands.

This Pennsylvania field is the spot of the culminating assault known (incorrectly) as Pickett’s Charge. It is here that some 12,000 Confederate soldiers walked headlong into a hail of Union bullets, artillery fire and munitions. When the Michigan Farm Bureau ProFILE class finished its march across that revenant ground, it stood at a point where history tells us roughly just 100 of the 12,000 made it to. It was a spectacular and decisive failure, fueled in large part by a likely lapse in leadership and decision-making.

“If there is a better place to study the impact leadership can have than here on the Gettysburg battlefields, I’ve yet to see it,” said Mieczkowski. “In your careers, you will stand where Gen. Lee stood, where Pickett stood, where Longstreet stood. The question is this: How will you lead your troops?”

ProFILE is Michigan Farm Bureau’s Institute for Leadership Education, a leadership experience for MFB members ages 25-35. The 15-month intensive is designed to provide participants with opportunities and experiences to help them grow personally and professionally.

Prior to the Washington Legislative Seminar, the 2020 ProFILE class of 15 students spent two days in Gettysburg, learning about leadership styles, techniques and tactics as part of the Lincoln Leadership Institute at Gettysburg.

The full-day course included classroom instruction at the historic David Wills House, where Pres. Lincoln stayed and prepared the Gettysburg address. The classroom instruction was then put to practical, real-world use on location where critical moments of leadership and decision-making took place during the battle at Gettysburg. From Union Col. Chamberlain’s inspirational defense of the unit’s flank on Little Round Top to Gen. Robert E. Lee’s fateful decision to attack the center of the Union line at Cemetery Ridge.

“Being in Gettysburg and seeing where the battle took place, thinking about how the decisions were made really was amazing,” said Casey Bozung of Kalamazoo County. “It’s something I’ll take back to my personal and professional life and will think about how I can be a better transactional and transformational leader.”

The Lincoln Leadership Institute is nationally renowned for its curriculum and has trained leaders from some of the country’s largest companies and brands. That reputation, according to the ProFILE participants, was well-earned.

“It was really an amazing experience,” said Matt Marston of Livingston County. “The hands-on experience and seeing exactly how the decisions and actions of those leaders changed history was awesome.”

The Gettysburg visit is just one facet of the 15-month ProFILE course. The group already participated in sessions on public speaking and, in September, will convene in St. Johns for media training.

“Our goal is to challenge the participants. We see this as an opportunity for their organization, Michigan Farm Bureau, to invest in them as a leader,” said Emily Reinart, Grassroots Policy

From a group of young Michigan professionals feeling the first warm rays of spring on their face after a long, cold winter, the upbeat chatter is to be expected.
Katie Eisenberger

Nine FFA chapters were honored at the Michigan FFA Convention for working ag-literacy efforts in their communities 

The Michigan Foundation for Agriculture’s #SpeakAgMichigan award honored nine FFA chapters with a total of $5,000 during the Michigan FFA Convention, March 4 at Michigan State University. Recognized chapters are working to help their community become more agriculturally literate, giving them a basic understanding of raising plants and animals for food, fuel and fiber.

Gold Chapters IthacaMontague and North Huron each received $800.

Receiving $500 as silver chapters were CaledoniaRavennaSt. Louis and Springport.

Bronze chapters receiving $300 were Breckenridge and Webberville.

Collectively, award recipients taught agriculture-based lessons to more than 6,000 students in their local school districts. These high school FFA members set goals, communicated with elementary teachers, planned and delivered grade-appropriate lessons or educational stations to show the many ways agriculture products are present in daily life. In addition, these award recipients organized agriculture and natural resources educational programming for more than 5,000 adults. Many partnered with their county Farm Bureaus to enhance programming for both organizations.

The Michigan Foundation for Agriculture’s mission is to communicate agriculture’s message to consumers and students through educational programming and to provide leadership development for agriculturalists of today and tomorrow. This award does just that. Inspired by National FFA’s similar initiative, the #SpeakAgMichigan award is more than just a social media trend, it can be a language used to close the gap between agriculture and consumers.

“The #SpeakAgMichigan Awards supports two of Michigan Farm Bureau’s top priorities: leadership development and consumer outreach. We are encouraged by, and are proud to recognize, the efforts of young agriculture leaders to bridge the communication gap between farmers and our consumers,” said Alex Schnabelrauch, director of the Michigan Foundation for Agriculture. “These FFA students are making a real difference in their schools and communities, and we look forward to connecting them with leadership and outreach opportunities long after graduation.”

Chapters receiving #SpeakAgMichigan award received a monetary contribution to further their agricultural literacy outreach efforts. Individual chapter efforts will be highlighted through out the fall of 2020 when the online application opens Sept. 1. Applications are due Dec. 1.

The Michigan Foundation for Agriculture, a 501(c)(3) governed by Michigan Farm Bureau’s Board of Directors, positively contributes to the future of Michigan agriculture through leadership and educational programming. The Michigan FFA Association is dedicated to making a positive difference in the lives of young people by developing their potential for premier leadership, personal growth and career success through agricultural education.

For more information, contact MFB Education High School & Collegiate Programs Specialist Katie Eisenberger at 517-679-5444.

The Michigan Foundation for Agriculture’s #SpeakAgMichigan award honored nine FFA chapters with a total of $5,000 during the Michigan FFA Convention, March 4 at Michigan State University.
Michigan Farm Bureau

Farm Bureau Insurance Managing Partner and Agent Charitable Fund Committee Member Nick Hurst sorting fresh fruit at the Food Bank of Eastern Michigan in Flint 2019

LANSING – To help Michigan consumers bridge the food gap during the state’s ongoing COVID challenge, the Michigan Farm Bureau Family of Companies — Farm Bureau Insurance of Michigan, Michigan Farm Bureau and the Agent Charitable Fund — have announced the launch of a statewide fundraiser, the “Million Meal Challenge.”

The Agent Charitable Fund and Farm Bureau Insurance of Michigan will donate $50,000 during the Million Meal Challenge and will match up to $50,000 in additional donations from members, clients and supporters.

With every dollar raised equating to six meals, the goal is to collectively donate a million meals to the seven regional food banks in Michigan, benefitting all 83 counties. 

In announcing the Million Meal Challenge, Don Simon, CEO, Farm Bureau Insurance of Michigan, said efforts to minimize exposure of COVID-19 through Michigan’s “Stay Home, Stay Safe” Executive Order (EO 2020-21) closing schools, restaurants and other establishments deemed non-essential, has left many families struggling to make ends meet. 

“Right now, it is more important than ever for our state to come together,” Simon said. “As we all face this pandemic, helping to provide Michigan children and families with healthy meals during this trying time is a great way for us to do just that. The entire Farm Bureau family is proud to sponsor this challenge so that together, with our partners and community members, we can provide one million meals.”

The fundraiser will engage every person who is part of the Michigan Farm Bureau family – agents, members, staff and insureds – to come together and support each other through uncertain times, according to Merrick Maris, Farm Bureau Insurance agent and Agent Charitable Fund Committee chair. 

“The Agent Charitable Fund was created to help people in need,” Maris said. “Our agents came together and created this fund in 2018 because we wanted to support the greater Michigan community, specifically children. This challenge allows us to ensure our kids and families who are in need are provided for during this time of crisis.” 

The Agent Charitable Fund, whose mission is to end hunger in Michigan, is a donor-designated fund administered through the Michigan Foundation for Agriculture. The Michigan Foundation for Agriculture, a 501(c)(3) governed by Michigan Farm Bureaus board of directors, positively contributes to the future of Michigan agriculture through leadership and educational programming.

Through grant programs and donations, Farm Bureau agents, clients and partners provide food and educational programs to Michigan residents struggling with hunger and aid the more than 3,000 hunger-relief agencies throughout the state. To donate toward the Million Meal Challenge, visit https://www.justgiving.com/campaign/millionmeals.

Michigan Farm Bureau and Michigan Farm News are committed to providing its members and readers with the latest news and information on the COVID-19 pandemic. For news, updates and resources, visit https://www.michfb.com/MI/Coronavirus/. The page will be updated daily as more information becomes available.

The Agent Charitable Fund and Farm Bureau Insurance of Michigan will donate $50,000 during the Million Meal Challenge and will match up to $50,000 in additional donations from members, clients and supporters.

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